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Organisation's Profile

The Human Resource Development Council (HRDC), operating under the aegis of the Ministry of Education and Human Resources, was set up as a corporate body in November 2003 as per the HRD Act 2003. The setting up of the HRDC was inspired by recommendations of a report on National Integrated Training Strategy, prepared by an International Labour Organisation (ILO) consultant, whereby the need for an apex body that would guide and provide the necessary thrust for human resource development in Mauritius was felt.

HRDC has been vested with the responsibility to look after and promote the development of the labour force in Mauritius in line with the requirements of a fast growing economy.

 

Vision & Mission

Our Vision
A Creative and Competent Human Resource Base
 
Our Mission
To develop institutional synergies for an integrated Human Resource Development Strategy

Our Objectives

The objectives of the HRDC as spelt out in the HRD Act 2003 are to:

  • Promote human resource development in line with national economic and social objectives;
  • Stimulate a culture of training and lifelong learning at the individual, organisational and national levels to enhance employability of the labour force and increase productivity; and
  • Provide the necessary human resource thrust for a successful transformation of the country’s economy into a Knowledge Economy.

Our Functions

The objectives of the HRDC as spelt out in the HRD Act 2003 are to:

  • Advise the Minister on the formulation of human resource development policies and strategies;
  • Administer, control and operate the National Training Fund;
  • Establish linkages between the education and training systems and the workplace;
  • Provide a forum for constant dialogue and consensus building among stakeholders on all matters relating to human resource development;
  • Take appropriate measures to reduce the mismatch between demand and supply of human resource;
  • Commission research in the field of human resource development;
  • Encourage employers to invest in staff training with a view to upgrading their skills and acquiring new skills;
  • Initiate and monitor studies on the relevance and impact of training activities in relation to the socio-economic development of the country;
  • Promote knowledge management and benchmarking at enterprise and national levels to improve the effectiveness of human resource development;
  • Identify and monitor the implementation of appropriate skills development and apprenticeship schemes and programmes;
  • Monitor the participation of employers, employees and job seekers in training programmes;
  • Develop schemes for retraining and multi-skilling;
  • Provide incentives for training institutions to acquire and upgrade their equipment and facilities; and
  • Perform such other functions as are necessary to further the objects of the HRD Council.

The Human Resource Development Act 2003: